Impeachment brings political conversations

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Impeachment brings political conversations

Jamilah Lewis, News writer

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For the  past few weeks, the news and media have been focused on President Trump and the Whistleblower complaint.   It has been a big topic in America and all over the world; and with this is becoming a bigger and bigger topic, it is being talked about in the classroom.

On Aug. 12 of this year, the whistleblower reported an “urgent concern” on what President Trump had been discussing with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.  President Trump asked Zelenskyy to do him the favor of looking into Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden.

With all of this occurring in our generation many people say the youth  should keep up with the impeachment inquiry  since the last president to be impeached was Bill Clinton. With most of  the teachers  alive when this happened many are educated on this topic.

“I have talked about impeachment in both my Honors Government and AP Government classes,” said social science teacher Libby Day. “Most of my government students are 17 or 18, and many will be able to vote in the 2020 election. It’s important that they understand the current political landscape so they can make an informed decision regarding their vote.”

The social science teachers that teach government and politics have talked about the subject and mixed it in with their teaching as well

“It [also allows students to understand the importance of the content of the course when it is the major news story of each day],’’ said social science teacher Colin Doyle.

The social science department have  meetings  at least once a month, so they have time to talk about it during that time.

“Whenever I have discussed impeachment with my colleagues, there is a consensus that this is an important issue to discuss with students,” Day said.

With government and politics classes are taken during a student’s junior or senior year, the underclassmen might not be educated on the topic. Are teachers teaching other subjects going over it with their students?

“In passing, I mentioned that I was going to bring it up and a couple of people said they were going to bring it up; but there was no concerted  effort about it,” said English teacher Kanoa Mulling.

The students also play a part in wanting to understand or wanting to keep up with the topic.

“The basic details were mentioned,” said Mishaye Hearn, a senior  taking Government and Civics Honors this semester.

“We talk about it in E-period with Ms.Drew”said  senior Shayla Blisset. In her classes they discussed things like if he will get impeached, if the whistleblower will go missing and a few  things about the topic.

“I feel it’s good to keep up with the impeachment inquiry to know when he’s charged, what he’s charged with, Blisset said.

Many teachers and students realize the importance of keeping up with the President Trump impeachment inquiry.

“What we learn in school shouldn’t exist in a vacuum, it should transfer to our lives,” said department chair of social science Carl Coates. “One of the expectations is that we talk about current and controversial topics.”

 

For the  past few weeks, the news and media have been focused on President Trump and the Whistleblower complaint.   It has been a big topic in America and all over the world; and with this is becoming a bigger and bigger topic, it is being talked about in the classroom.

On Aug. 12 of this year, the whistleblower reported an “urgent concern” on what President Trump had been discussing with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy.  President Trump asked Zelenskyy to do him the favor of looking into Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden.

With all of this occurring in our generation many people say the youth  should keep up with the impeachment inquiry  since the last president to be impeached was Bill Clinton. With most of  the teachers  alive when this happened many are educated on this topic.

“I have talked about impeachment in both my Honors Government and AP Government classes,” said social science teacher Libby Day. “Most of my government students are 17 or 18, and many will be able to vote in the 2020 election. It’s important that they understand the current political landscape so they can make an informed decision regarding their vote.”

The social science teachers that teach government and politics have talked about the subject and mixed it in with their teaching as well

“It [also allows students to understand the importance of the content of the course when it is the major news story of each day],’’ said social science teacher Colin Doyle.

The social science department have  meetings  at least once a month, so they have time to talk about it during that time.

“Whenever I have discussed impeachment with my colleagues, there is a consensus that this is an important issue to discuss with students,” Day said.

With government and politics classes are taken during a student’s junior or senior year, the underclassmen might not be educated on the topic. Are teachers teaching other subjects going over it with their students?

“In passing, I mentioned that I was going to bring it up and a couple of people said they were going to bring it up; but there was no concerted  effort about it,” said English teacher Kanoa Mulling.

The students also play a part in wanting to understand or wanting to keep up with the topic.

“The basic details were mentioned,” said Mishaye Hearn, a senior  taking Government and Civics Honors this semester.

“We talk about it in E-period with Ms.Drew”said  senior Shayla Blisset. In her classes they discussed things like if he will get impeached, if the whistleblower will go missing and a few  things about the topic.

“I feel it’s good to keep up with the impeachment inquiry to know when he’s charged, what he’s charged with, Blisset said.

Many teachers and students realize the importance of keeping up with the President Trump impeachment inquiry.

“What we learn in school shouldn’t exist in a vacuum, it should transfer to our lives,” said department chair of social science Carl Coates. “One of the expectations is that we talk about current and controversial topics.”

 

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